Mirrors: Found in Collection II: Contemporary Photography from the Danforth Art Museum Permanent Collection

Mirrors: Found in Collection II: Contemporary Photography from the Danforth Art Museum Permanent Collection
Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester, MA
March 9 – March 31, 2017

ThursdayMarch 16, 7-9pm: Gallery talk with Jessica Roscio, Danforth Art Museum curator

Mirrors
Found in Collection: Contemporary Photography from the Danforth Art Permanent Collection Part II
March 9 – March 31, 2017

February 20, 2017 (Winchester, MA)__ The second install of Found in Collection: Contemporary Photography from the Danforth Art Museum Permanent Collection will be presented in two parts at the Griffin Museum of Photography. Both paintings and photographs will be exhibited, including work by John Brook, Arno Rafael Minkkinen, Julie Melton, Jesseca Ferguson, Samuel Quinn, David Prifti, Jaclyn Kain, Molly Lamb, Gail Samuelson, and Ruth Thorne-Thomsen, among others. The first install of exhibitions took place at the Griffin Museum of Photography during the month of December 2016. In Part Two Memory will be shown in the Atelier Gallery and Mirrors will be exhibited in the Griffin Gallery as part of Found in Collection: Contemporary Photography from the Danforth Art Museum Permanent Collection from March 9th through March 31st, 2017. An opening reception will take place on March 9, 2017 from 6:30-8:30pm. The will be a curator’s talk, with Roscio on March 16, 2017 at 7 PM at the Griffin Museum.

“Memory and absence wind their way through the second part of Danforth Art’s two-part exhibition Found in Collection,” writes Jessica Roscio, curator for the Danforth Art Museum. “Imagined travel narratives, lost places, and remembered spaces are envisioned in photographs, paintings, and drawings from the late nineteenth century to today…… [and] is apparent in works throughout this exhibition,” she says. Roscio goes on to say that the works in Mirror “comment on the surreal aspects of one’s interior life, and its collision with an often fantastical and disturbing reality. In turbulent, uncertain times, the allure of an alternate reality, or simply the belief in illusion, appeals to our need for escapism.”

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